History

The History Team aims to foster a love for the subject and to help develop enquiring minds. To nurture students who think independently and have a desire to find out more. For students to develop as happy and confident citizens.

History helps us to develop a better understanding of how our nation and world evolved, allowing us to make sense of the world we live in. It helps us to look beyond the obvious, to ask questions, and to be able to present well-argued opinions. It helps to prepare us for the responsibilities we have towards each other.

History at The King’s involves a wide variety of learning experiences and skills including research, extended writing, historical source analysis, role play, discussion and debate. The emphasis is for students to think independently and question established viewpoints. Investigations are encouraged outside the classroom with field-trips sought for each year group.

• Ms C Protasiuk – Subject Team Leader
• Miss J Batters – Teacher of History & RE

The two-year Key Stage 3 History curriculum is built around a clear thematic structure which provides breadth and offers in-depth opportunities to explore a number of topics. Each stage of the curriculum is built around an overarching theme/question that links the units of study.

In Year 7, the theme ‘People shape history’ provides students with an insight into power and how different groups influence the development of a country. Students investigate the changing lifestyles of different sections of society and explore the relationship between the rulers and the ruled.

Year 8 focuses on ‘Beliefs change history’. The emphasis on key moments in the development of Britain and Europe, exploring the changing of the world from medieval to early modern. The effects of religion and learning on society are explored.

Year 7

➢ What will we study ?

People Shape History ! 1066-1500

Our introduction looks at what is History and how and why we study it. Research on the Anglo-Saxons and England before the Norman Conquest provides a foundation of subject knowledge to build on over the years.

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The year’s Big Question ‘Who made our country – rulers or rebels?’ focuses on the development of England from 1066-1500. Local history is investigated through the building of Pontefract Castle, Transhelf’s entry in the Domesday Book and the legend of Robin Hood.

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➢ What different activities will help us to learn ?

A wide range of activities and learning opportunities will be used including research and extended writing, source analysis, and, group and class discussion. Role play, school trips and the use of ICT will be developed.

➢ How will we be assessed?

There will be ongoing assessment involving oral and written work. Focus Tasks allow for independent study and the personal choice of how to present research tasks. Peer and self-assessment are encouraged, as well as ongoing ‘feedback conversations’ with class teachers.

➢ How will this help me to make progress in History?

This will give a sound knowledge of chronology and key themes that are developed in Year 8.

Topics taught on a local and national scale will continue to be explored and students will begin to investigate key turning points in the development of Europe.

Year 8

➢ What will we study?

Beliefs change history ! 1500-1750

This year students will focus on the Big Question :

“The pen is mightier than the sword”. Is this correct?

The topic, Pirates – past and present, encourages students to look at how attitudes to people and events colour interpretations of them.
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Europe’s turning points of the Renaissance and Reformation/Counter Reformation are investigated. How did contact with the Muslim world stimulate change? How did key events in Europe influence Britain’s development? Is it true that ideas have a longer, more powerful effect than the use of force?

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Pontefract’s links with key events in the Wars of the Roses, Tudor history and its claim as having the last castle to surrender in the English Civil War will be studied. Would the town have a thriving tourist economy if people in the seventeenth century hadn’t torn down the castle?

➢ What different activities will help us to learn?

A wide range of activities and learning opportunities will be used including, research and extended writing, source analysis, and, group and class discussion. Role play, school trips and the use of ICT will be developed.

➢ How will we be assessed?

There will be ongoing assessment involving oral and written work. Focus Tasks allow for independent study and the personal choice of how to present research tasks. Peer and self-assessment are encouraged, as well as ongoing ‘feedback conversations’ with class teachers.

➢ How will this help me to make progress in History?

The year builds on some key themes and the chronology explored in Year 7. The shift to European history allows students to look at the past from a wider perspective. To begin to link periods, people and events across nations. Skills and concepts will be further developed.

➢ GCSE : what are my option choices?

Students will make GCSE option choices in the spring of Year 8. Those who decide to end their study of History will have a knowledge of history into the eighteenth century plus skills that can be transferred to the study of other subjects.
Students who continue to study History in Year 9 will have a strong base on which to develop their knowledge and understanding of the past. A past that affects the world we live in today. Their strengthening skills will help their progress at GCSE level – in History and other examination subjects.

GCSE History is a good academic qualification and is well regarded by employers.

The National Curriculum and an introduction to GCSE History Year 9
Exam Board: Edexcel
Qualification: GCSE Entry Level➢ What will we study ?

Events revolutionise history ! 1750-1900; the Twentieth Century

The year will focus on 2 Big Questions :

1 ‘Did the Industrial Revolution change the world for the better?’

The causes and effects of the world’s first industrial revolution will be studied. Did the North make Britain ‘great’ ? Protest methods, past and present, will be compared. Other topics include crime and punishment, and the role of charity in the Victorian age. The opportunity for personal research into areas such as sport, health or chocolate will be available.

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2. ‘How should the 20th century be remembered?’

Was the century just a century of war?

The causes and effects of both World Wars are examined. Hitler’s rise to power and the Holocaust will be researched – significant events of the past or relevant lessons for today’s citizens?

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Was the century a century of reform and forward thinking?

Votes for women, the introduction of the National Health Service, the end of empire, and modern technology are some of the areas available for research.
Work done on the twentieth century will create a foundation of knowledge and understanding that will be further developed in years 10
and 11.

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➢ What different activities will help us to learn?

A wide range of activities and learning opportunities including, research and extended writing, source analysis, and, group and class discussion.

➢ How will we be assessed?

There will be ongoing assessment involving oral and written work. Focus Tasks allow for independent study and the personal choice of how to present research tasks. Peer and self-assessment are encouraged, as well as ongoing ‘feedback conversations’ with class teachers.

Many assessment tasks will focus on the key skills required at GCSE so enabling a good transition into the next phase of learning. Controlled Assessments should result in a GCSE Entry Level certificate – below a GCSE grade G but a ‘stepping stone’ to this higher examination course.

➢ How will this help me to make progress in History?

By the end of year 9 students will have developed a broad historical knowledge and understanding of British and modern world history. They should be able to respond to historical debates and analyse sources of evidence effectively. This forms a sound basis from which students are able to further develop at GCSE.

Key Stage 4 (Years 9, 10 and 11)

Course Title: Modern World History
Exam Board: Edexcel, Specification A www.edexcel.com
Qualification: GCSE

About the course

Learning about the past enables students to develop their own ideas and beliefs about the world today. History GCSE allows students to ask questions of the present through engagement with the past. They also have the opportunity to develop skills necessary for the modern world and workplace.

In Year 9 students followed a foundation GCSE course that helped them to acquire an overview of the twentieth century and to develop key skills and processes in preparation for their GCSE examination units.
The two year GCSE course is made up of four equally weighted units. Students are required to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of different historical periods. Students make connections and comparisons between different aspects of the periods, themes and topics studied. They also assess the significance of individuals, events, developments and ideas in the topics studied. Sources are analysed and evaluated, interpretations of the past examined.

Year 10

➢ What will we study?

MODULE 1 Britain 1908-28 allows students to understand, analyse and evaluate how the past has been interpreted and represented in different ways by looking at sources on early twentieth century Britain.

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MODULE 2 USA 1919-41 is a depth study with students considering how the USA came to overtake Great Britain and become the most powerful nation in the world. Students also look at how America’s economic collapse in 1929 led to the Great Depression, possibly also helping to lead to World War II.

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In July of Year 10 students will have the opportunity to visit The Imperial War Museum North, Manchester to see how history is represented in a modern setting. This provides a good introduction to the assessment work that will take place in Year 11.

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➢ What different activities will help us to learn?

A range of learning opportunities including research, in depth source analysis, understanding of interpretations, historical debate and a school trip. Independent learning is encouraged so students can develop a variety of learning skills.

➢ How will we be assessed?

Assessment is based around exam style questions, oral and written, throughout the year. Mock/Trial exams will allow progress to be monitored and exam techniques developed. Students will take an increasing responsibility for self and peer assessment of work.

Year 11

➢ What will we study ?

MODULE 3 is the Controlled Assessment, Government and Protest in the USA 1941-70. Students examine the effects of the civil rights movements and the varying significance of the people involved. Other protest movements of the time – including Women’s Liberation and the Anti-Vietnam War movement – are studied, examining how they have been represented over time.

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MODULE 4 is a development study of International relations from the end of World War II to 1991. The study of the Cold War allows students to examine the changes in world politics throughout this era and the factors bringing about these changes. The origins of the Cold War; flashpoints, including Berlin and Cuba ; détente and the collapse of the Soviet Union are investigated.

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➢ What different activities will help us to learn?

A range of learning opportunities including research, in depth source analysis, understanding of interpretations and historical debate. Independent learning continues to be encouraged with students developing their learning skills especially examination preparation.

➢ How will we be assessed?

Day to day assessment will continue as in Year 10.

Final assessment in year 11 is through Controlled Assessment and 3 examinations :

Unit 1 : The Cold War Examination 25%
Unit 2 : USA 1919-41 Examination 25%
Unit 3 : Britain 1908-28 Examination 25%
Unit 4 : Government and Protest in the USA C.A 25%

➢ How will this help me to make progress beyond GCSE?

Students will develop an in depth knowledge of modern world history and an understanding of historical debate. They will also develop source skills and the confidence to build analytical arguments. All should be able to identify and explain factors for change. This gives a sound basis for study at AS level.

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Students who do not carry on their academic study of History should be able to use what they have learnt to move forward into the world of work with full participation in national and international citizenship.

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AIM : students to become INDEPENDENT LEARNERS

• responsible for their own learning
• able to move forward and make progress

Assessment is an important part of the teaching and learning process, a valuable tool for students and teachers.

We use the outcomes of assessment to help students monitor their own progress and to help them understand the next steps forward in History. Assessment is a continuous process, reflected in oral and written tasks, general activities and specific Focus Tasks.
Peer and self-assessment allows our students to fully understand what is needed to move forward.

SOLO : from September 2013 History will be using this method to help students discuss where they believe they are in their learning and to understand what they need to do next.

A fuller introduction to this system can be found at the start of a student’s exercise book.

➢ Class Trips :

Trips are planned each year, reflecting the year groups’ subject needs and possible learning opportunities. Pontefract Castle, Temple Newsam, the National Mining Museum, Thackery Medical Museum and the Imperial War Museum North have all visited.
School visits to the World War I / II battlefields (English Department), Beth Shalom (RE) and The Houses of Parliament (Year 8) have historical significance.

➢ The Chess Club

Thursdays – 12.30 to 1.10pm , M3

You may bring your lunch to avoid losing playing time!

Tournaments will be arranged over the year.

History and L2L have teamed together to ensure all Year 7s have the opportunity to learn how to play chess. Confident players coaching the less sure and novices.

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➢ GCSE Bonus Time

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Wednesdays 3.20 to 4.15pm , M3 and H1

All GCSE students (years 9-11) have the opportunity to access teacher advice and have one to one or small group tuition.
Across the year all students will be asked to attend one to one meetings to discuss individual progress and ongoing needs for personal development.

➢ AS Critical Thinking

Tuesdays 3.30 to 4.15pm , M3 – ended January 2013.
Awaiting curriculum changes to see it this extra-curricular course can be resumed.

The school’s guideline on HOME LEARNING allows each subject to set work as appropriate; each subject ensuring that this area of student learning is not neglected.

HISTORY seeks to produce a variety of Home Learning opportunities:

– set, one week limited, tasks

– Focus Tasks set over a number of weeks, with a key question but a variety of ways to work towards a final conclusion

– a ‘ladder’ offering a variety of activities, covering a variety of skills/concepts and numerous ways to achieve

– personal research opportunities within a given sphere of reference

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Research /tasks:

• Student share area on school site – History
www.activehistorry.co.uk – username and password needed – should be noted in Planner /exercise book

www.bbc.co.uk – History and or Learning sections

GCSE History:

www.edexcel.com– for parents and students

www.bbc.co.uk – History and or Learning sections, including Bitesize History

Prospectus

Please click here to download a pdf version of our School Prospectus.